Advertisement
Advertisement

Fitness & Exercise

Heat Stroke
Directory Menu

Heat Stroke Directory

This article is from the WebMD Feature Archive

Exercising in the Heat

continued...

A large percentage of people couldn’t finish the race, says Branch.

For you, exercising in the heat may not mean running 26.2 miles. But even if you’re not planning to run a marathon, you want to be smart before embarking on a summer workout.

When taking on summer exercise outdoors, says Argyle, Texas, exercise physiologist Jaime Roberts, "we need to be aware of the increase in heat and humidity."

Typically, says Roberts, our bodies are warmer than the environment. When that begins to change, our muscles regulate heat by releasing sweat, which allows the body to cool itself. But when the body is sweating, it’s losing fluid, she says.

Heat exhaustion and heat stroke, dangerous side effects of overdoing summer exercise, come when the body can no longer sustain the pace, the heat, the humidity, or the loss of fluid.

"The body cools off by sweating," says Roberts, "and as long as you remain hydrated, the body is able to cool itself off."

Advertisement
Advertisement